Photo: "Nothing But A Memory"

 
 

If you follow my photography or blog, you’ve likely heard how devastated I am that this beautiful, former asylum has met its demise. When I took this photo, I was standing in a corridor that is now merely a memory. 

People often ask me why I shoot these locations and this building right here is a perfect example why. I first photographed this hospital 6 years ago and I returned last year for a second time. Here we are one year later and nothing remains but a small center section of the building. These places are vanishing rapidly and I want to be there to document as many historic sites as I can. 

Photo: "Intertwined"

 
 

Sadly not much is known about this beautiful power plant, but it appears to have been part of the former 1950's era Beaunit Rayon Factory in Childersburg, Alabama. 

The plant still stands on well maintained grounds between many active businesses, while the rubble of the now demolished Rayon Factory lays scattered around the nearby fields. 

Photo: "North Island"

(Full moon night. 240 seconds. f/10. ISO 200)

Earlier this year, I took a night photography workshop in Arizona taught by Mike Hows and Joe Reed. It was a really great time hanging out in this airplane boneyard catching up with old friends. If you’re looking to do a night photography workshop I’d strongly encourage you to check out one of theirs. They get access to rad locations and have a great laid back and “hands on” teaching style.    

Photo: "Goodbye"

Demolition on Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital has been underway for a few months now and yesterday, video was posted showing the demolition has reached the Administration section of the Kirkbride, which means this corridor is gone. 

In a few months, she will be nothing more than a memory and that is very tragic. History is vanishing right before our eyes and once it is gone, it will be too late to ever get it back…

Photo: "Seclusion Doors"

 
 

These seclusion rooms are located on the first floor, basement level, of the Polk Building, or K Building, at the Western State Hospital in Tennessee. These rooms contained two doors, the first has an open window with a metal covering. The second is a solid wood door with a glass window. This allowed nurses to check on patients but kept the noise to a minimum.